Potential winter storm on track for Maryland Sunday through Monday

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|| Closures/Delays | Weather Advisories | speed cameras | Forecast | Email Alerts | Send us your photos ||Follow: @ttasselWBAL | @AvaWBAL | @TonyPannWBAL | @TaylorWBAL | @wbaltv11BALTIMORE — A coastal storm may bring snow to Maryland Sunday night. Weather meteorologist Ava Marie said. Timing: 5 p.m. Sunday through noon Monday Metro Baltimore: Snow (1-3 inches with 3-6 inches north and west), then sleet/freezing rain, then rain. Wind gusts over 40 mph Sunday evening. East Coast: Snow (0 to 1 inch), then rain, strong winds. Cambridge and points south mostly looking like rain, maybe a few thunderstorms. Mountains west of Interstate 81: heavy snow (6 to 18 inches), windy. the ocean and everything turns to rain. The rain could be heavy at times, before ending before noon Monday. Winds will also be strong on Sunday evening, with gusts of over 40 mph possible, which could lead to downed trees and power outages. The strongest winds will likely blow over the East Coast. Heaviest snow to fall, of course, in western Maryland As of Thursday and based on the latest storm track, the heaviest snow will fall in western Maryland, where up to a foot of snow is possible. The northwest suburbs of Baltimore could see around 3 to 6 inches of snow with less in the southeast around 1 to 3 inches. If the storm’s track shifts east, Baltimore could see more snow. If the storm’s track moved west, Baltimore would receive less snow. As the snow turns to rain late Sunday evening, there is also a risk of ice buildup before ground temperatures warm above freezing through Monday morning. Early models show the storm appears to be taking an inland track. The system will cross the Rocky Mountains before plunging towards the Gulf of Mexico, where it will suck in air and lots of moisture. Early models seem to show that the storm is following an inland path, which would mean a mix of rain and snow. Severe snowstorms in Baltimore usually occur when storms stay off the coast. Stay with 11 News and WBALTV.com and the WBAL-TV app for weather updates.

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BALTIMORE– A coastal storm may bring snow to Maryland Sunday evening.

Potential coastal storm Sunday to Monday

UPDATE: Thursday (6:45 a.m.) — A Nor’easter could impact Maryland from Sunday evening through Monday morning, said WBAL-TV 11 meteorologist Ava Marie.

  • Hourly: 5 p.m. from Sunday to Monday noon
  • Baltimore Metro: Snow (1 to 3 inches with 3 to 6 inches to the north and west), then ice pellets/freezing rain, then rain. Wind gusts over 40 km / h Sunday evening.
  • East shore: Snow (0 to 1 inch), then rain, strong winds. Cambridge and points to the south mostly look like rain, possibly thunderstorms.
  • Mountains west of Interstate 81: Heavy snow (6 to 18 inches), windy.

Snow can start around 4 p.m. Sunday with some accumulation possible, before warm air is pulled from the ocean and everything turns to rain. The rain could be heavy at times, before ending before noon Monday.

Winds will also be strong on Sunday evening, with gusts of over 40 mph possible, which could lead to downed trees and power outages. The strongest winds will likely blow over the East Coast.

The heaviest snow to fall, of course, in Western Maryland

Starting Thursday and based on the latest storm track, the heaviest snow will fall in western Maryland, where up to a foot of snow is possible. The northwest suburbs of Baltimore could see around 3 to 6 inches of snow with less in the southeast around 1 to 3 inches.

If the storm’s track shifts east, Baltimore could see more snow. If the storm’s track moved west, Baltimore would receive less snow.

As the snow turns to rain late Sunday evening, there is also a risk of ice buildup before ground temperatures warm above freezing through Monday morning.

Early models show the storm appears to be taking an inland path

The system will cross the Rocky Mountains before plunging towards the Gulf of Mexico, where it will suck in air and lots of moisture.

Early models appear to show the storm taking an inland path, which would mean a mix of rain and snow. Severe snowstorms in Baltimore usually occur when storms stay off the coast.

Stay with 11 News and WBALTV.com and the WBAL-TV app for weather updates.

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